Yoranian

The Yoranian

History

The Yoranian, also known as the Yorky Pom, Yorkie Pom, Yoranian Terrier, or most unfortunately the Porkie, is a cross between a Pomeranian and a Yorkshire Terrier. Not surprisingly, the Yorkshire Terrier originated in Yorkshire, England. They were developed there in the 19th century to catch rats in clothing mills. The first “Yorkie” was registered with the American Kennel Club in 1885. The other genetic branch of the Pom-A-Poo belongs to the Pomeranian, a breed that originated in Central and Eastern Europe. Popular with British royalty since the 18th century, the Pomeranian has enjoyed status as one of the most-loved breeds for years.

The Yoranian is recognized by the American Canine Hybrid Club, the Designer Dogs Kennel Club, and the International Designer Canine Registry.

Appearance

The Yoranian is very small and typically black, brown, or white in color. Depending on which side of their heritage is more dominant, their fur can be fluffy, shiny, short, silky, thick, wiry or any combination of these things. The Yoranian is listed as having hypoallergenic fur, so it may be a good choice for those who can’t have most other breeds of dogs. If not participating in shows, many owners will trim the fur for ease of care. Its appearance heavily depends on the genetic makeup of its parents, and like any crossbred, can vary.

Temperament

The Yoranian is very energetic and often participates in agility or obedience contests. Their personalities have been described as affectionate, friendly, intelligent, loving, playful and sweet. They are not difficult to train and also not particularly active. This might make them a good choice for someone who travels for work or who can’t walk their dog every day. They are generally good with children, however, the very young will need to be taught not to grip them too tightly for fear of injury.

Health

The Yoranian has a life expectancy of 11-15 years, about average for a toy dog. Health concerns are similar to most dog breeds, and with regular exercise and grooming, no major health problems are likely to occur. Due to a dental condition common in Pomeranians, dry dog food is recommended. Health issues often seen in the Yorkshire Terrier include bronchitis, lymphangiectasia, portosystemic shunt, cataracts, and keratitis sicca. Additionally, Yorkies often have a delicate digestive system, with vomiting or diarrhea resulting from consumption of foods outside of a regular diet.

Yoranian