Rottle

The Rottle

History

The Rottle is a cross between a Rottweiler and a standard poodle. The poodle is an extremely popular breed, originating in Germany and standardized in France where it is the national dog. Poodles have very old roots, with carvings of the breed dating back to the 15th century. The other genetic branch of the Rottle belongs to the Rottweiler, a breed that likely descended from ancient Roman drover dogs. In Medieval Europe, they were used as herders and guard dogs by butchers and common police dogs during World War I. Rottweilers are still used by law enforcement but have branched out to include careers as search and rescue, guides for the blind, and guarding duties of all sorts.

The Rottle is recognized by the American Canine Hybrid Club, the Designer Dogs Kennel Club, and the International Designer Canine Registry.

Appearance

The Rottle is a large dog, and can weigh 100 pounds as an adult. The Rottle’s genetic makeup depends heavily upon the genes passed down by its parents. The most common colors for Rottles are black, brown, silver, and white. Their fur is thick and dense, but they don’t shed often or much. If the fur is curly or straight depends upon this same genetic makeup, and like all crossbreeds, appearance can vary dog to dog.

Temperament

The Rottle is fairly active and quite athletic. Their personalities have been described as affectionate, alert, cheerful, gentle, intelligent, loyal, protective, and sweet. They tend to make outstanding watchdogs, and are very good with children and other pets. Rottles are easily trained, requiring minimal repetition. By nature, they are obedient dogs.

 Health

The Rottle has a life expectancy of 9-15 years, about average for a large dog. Regular exercise is a must to maintain their health and fitness. If overfed or under exercised, Rottles are prone to obesity Health concerns are similar to most dog breeds and with regular exercise and grooming no major health problems are likely. As with most large breeds, hip dysplasia can be a problem; be sure to have a qualified professional x-ray your Rottle to diagnose this disorder. with most large breeds, hip dysplasia can be a problem; be sure to have a qualified professional x-ray your Rottle to diagnose this disorder.

Rottle