Cocker Spaniel

History

Cocker Spaniels are pets belonging to two breeds of the dog form: the American Cocker Spaniel and the English Cocker Spaniel, both which are commonly termed basically Cocker Spaniel within their countries of origin. Cocker Spaniels were initially bred as tracking dogs within the United Kingdom, using the phrase cocker drawing from their use to hunt the Eurasian woodcock. When the type was taken to the United States, it was bred to a different standard, which allowed it to specialize in tracking the American woodcock. Further bodily improvements were bred into the cocker in the United States through the early part of 20th century.

Physical Appearance

They have this kind of attractive, desirable face, with lovely, significant dark-brown oval eyes (often hazel-colored). Cocker’s ears are certainly one of their most attractive and finest features. They set low which allows them to lie close to the head. They are pendulous and long and are covered in beautiful, soft, flowing fur. Cocker Spaniels are medium sized, sturdy and very compact. They possess a short back, with a deep barreled chest, and has chunky paws. Their skull is rounded but yet gently flattened. Its nose is delicately shaped and is the same length as the skull. Their lovely coat has two layers; a light, silky top coat that is straight and flat, however it can sometimes be wavy, and incredibly gentle and soft to the contact. Its undercoat is short and thick. The Cocker Spaniel dogs may expand to approximately 39 and 41cm (15-16″) tall. The Female is generally smaller so that as an adult will accomplish between 38 and 39cm (15-15.5″). The perfect weight for both sexes is somewhere 14.5 and between 12 kg.

Temperament

The Cocker Spaniel has a lovely nature. He’s cuddly and loving and likes to participate in family activities. This breed is particularly good with smaller children, making them excellent family dogs. He’s lively, attentive, and active, enjoying any workout from a long stroll to running through fields and swimming. The Cocker is known to be a delicate pet. He has a “soft” temperament and does not respond properly to unpleasant treatment. Early socialization and training is essential to show the Cocker suitable canine manners. They can often times suffer from separation anxiety, as they do not like to be left alone for long periods of time.

Health

Some common health issues with the Cocker include; Eye problems (in many different ways), Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), Hypothyroidism, Primary seborrhea, allergies, idiopathic epilepsy, canine hip dysplasia, and Patellar luxation.

Cocker Spaniel