Cairn Terrier

History

The Cairn Terrier is one of the earliest of the terrier breeds. It originates from the Scottish Highlands and is recognized as one of the earliest working dogs in Scotland. This breed was given its name cairn as a result of the breed’s functionality to hunt and chase quarry found between the cairns in the Scottish Highlands.

Physical Appearance

The Cairn Terrier includes a harsh weather-resistant outer coat which can be wheaten, red, cream, black gray, sandy or brindled in virtually any of those shades. Many kennel clubs do not pure black, white, or black and tan. A noteworthy attribute of Cairns is the fact that Cairns generally alter color during their lifetime. It’s not unusual to get a brindled Cairn to become progressively more black or silver as it gets older.  The Cairn has two coats; a gentle, thick undercoat and a harsh exterior coating. A well-groomed Cairn features a rough-and- prepared appearance, free of artifice or exaggeration. The Cairn Terrier was documented into the National run club in 1903.

Temperament

Although they are good household dogs, small kids and Cairn Terriers aren’t a good mix. This type does not have lots of patience and it has been proven to bite. Youngsters who are too young when it is time to leave the dog alone are not a good mix.
Barking is the biggest issue owners have of the Cairn. Like other terriers, Cairns often won’t stop barking at every noise, approaching car, bike cat, or dog until they are ready. They have a very shrill sounding bark and will very easily annoy the neighbors.

Cairns might be intense and can be aggressive. People do not typically think of tiny kids as intense or aggressive, but Cairns are not animals that are patient. If teased or frustrated, they snap, snarl or bite. They are very controlling of food and toys, and so are unlikely to become discouraged by bigger dogs.

Health

These pets are not generally unhealthy and survive about 12 to 17 years.

Cairn Terrier